Jesus and the Pharisees: Luke 19:38-40

This is our thirty-second study. Please click HERE for an introduction to this study.

Luke 19:38-40

38 “Blessed is the king who comes in the name of the Lord!”

“Peace in heaven and glory in the highest!”

39 Some of the Pharisees in the crowd said to Jesus, “Teacher, rebuke your disciples!”

40 “I tell you,” he replied, “if they keep quiet, the stones will cry out.”

Observations

When Jesus’ followers were praising Him as they came to Jerusalem, the Pharisees were offended. They didn’t think He deserved praise because they didn’t think He was the Messiah. But Jesus rightly did not stop their praise. He instead referred to the Psalms, saying that even the stones will praise Him (see Ps 96:11 and 98:7-9).

Application

Those that don’t believe will naturally be offended when believers praise Him. But all those who truly believe will be joyful and join the praises.

Jesus and the Pharisees: No servant can serve two masters (Luke 16:13-15)

This is our thirtieth study. Please click HERE for an introduction to this study.

Luke 16:13-15

13 “No servant can serve two masters. Either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve both God and Money.”

14 The Pharisees, who loved money, heard all this and were sneering at Jesus. 15 He said to them, “You are the ones who justify yourselves in the eyes of men, but God knows your hearts. What is highly valued among men is detestable in God’s sight.

Observations

When Jesus set forth the principle, you cannot serve God and money, the Pharisees sneered at Jesus, because they believed that their own riches justified themselves before God. And this, their self-righteousness, was their downfall.

Application

The love of money is idolatry. Money is useful only if it is used to benefit His kingdom—otherwise it will be our downfall. Therefore, let us stay away from any thought of getting rich for our own good. Let us despise that idea.

Jesus and the Pharisees: from Luke 15:1-7

This is our twenty-ninth study. Please click HERE for an introduction to this study.

Luke 15:1-7

Now the tax collectors and “sinners” were all gathering around to hear him. 2 But the Pharisees and the teachers of the law muttered, “This man welcomes sinners and eats with them.”

3 Then Jesus told them this parable: 4 “Suppose one of you has a hundred sheep and loses one of them. Does he not leave the ninety-nine in the open country and go after the lost sheep until he finds it? 5 And when he finds it, he joyfully puts it on his shoulders 6 and goes home. Then he calls his friends and neighbors together and says, ‘Rejoice with me; I have found my lost sheep.’ 7 I tell you that in the same way there will be more rejoicing in heaven over one sinner who repents than over ninety-nine righteous persons who do not need to repent.

Observations

In this parable the Pharisees though that the sinner had to seek God and His forgiveness—to earn the right to be in His presence. But God turns it all around. He is the one who reaches out to the sinner, to befriend the sinner in order to save him. God loves every one of his created ones, even those who are not yet found (saved).

Application

We all have a lot of work to do to bring the lost back into the fold. We must do whatever it takes to bring them to salvation. We must be a friend to them.

Jesus and the Pharisees: from Luke 13:31-33

This is our twenty-seventh study. Please click HERE for an intro to this study.

Luke 13:31-33

31 At that time some Pharisees came to Jesus and said to him, “Leave this place and go somewhere else. Herod wants to kill you.”

32 He replied, “Go tell that fox, ‘I will drive out demons and heal people today and tomorrow, and on the third day I will reach my goal.’ 33 In any case, I must keep going today and tomorrow and the next day — for surely no prophet can die outside Jerusalem!

Observations

The Pharisees were not being kind to Jesus by warning Him of Herod. As John MacArthur noted in his bible notes, “They hoped the threat of violence from Herod would either silence Him or drive him back to Judea.” Jesus’ comment of “that fox,” was a bold statement of fact and indicated that Herod was crafty. The Pharisees were probably astonished at His boldness. As for Jesus, He was not at all intimidated by Herod or slowed down in His mission.

Application

We ought to be steadfast in our  ministry like Jesus, willing to continue regardless of the threats of the world.

Jesus and the Pharisees: from Luke 11:53-12:3

This is our twenty-sixth study. Please click HERE for an intro to this study.

Luke 11:53-12:3

53 When Jesus left there, the Pharisees and the teachers of the law began to oppose him fiercely and to besiege him with questions, 54 waiting to catch him in something he might say.

12 Meanwhile, when a crowd of many thousands had gathered, so that they were trampling on one another, Jesus began to speak first to his disciples, saying: “Be on your guard against the yeast of the Pharisees, which is hypocrisy. 2 There is nothing concealed that will not be disclosed, or hidden that will not be made known. 3 What you have said in the dark will be heard in the daylight, and what you have whispered in the ear in the inner rooms will be proclaimed from the roofs.

Observations

In verse 53 and 54, the reason why the Pharisees were so angry at Jesus is because of Jesus’ earlier rebuke of them—His “woes” on them. And so, they were plotting against Him to catch Him off guard. But Jesus, being always on guard, was more concerned with His disciples that they be on their guard against the hypocrisy of the Pharisees. He knew that they were always hiding something, they were always not being truthful. And so, He told them that in the judgment everything will come out, all that is hidden will be made known.

Application

We are always to be on our guard against unbelievers like the Pharisees. People like them are always hiding something; they are always whispering something. They are not to be trusted. But in the end, everyone will find out the truth. No one will get away with anything.

Jesus and the Pharisees: from Luke 11:37-44

This is our twenty-fifth study. Please click HERE for an intro to this study.

Luke 11:37-44

37 When Jesus had finished speaking, a Pharisee invited him to eat with him; so he went in and reclined at the table. 38 But the Pharisee, noticing that Jesus did not first wash before the meal, was surprised.

39 Then the Lord said to him, “Now then, you Pharisees clean the outside of the cup and dish, but inside you are full of greed and wickedness. 40 You foolish people! Did not the one who made the outside make the inside also? 41 But give what is inside [the dish] to the poor, and everything will be clean for you.

42 “Woe to you Pharisees, because you give God a tenth of your mint, rue and all other kinds of garden herbs, but you neglect justice and the love of God. You should have practiced the latter without leaving the former undone.

43 “Woe to you Pharisees, because you love the most important seats in the synagogues and greetings in the marketplaces.

44 “Woe to you, because you are like unmarked graves, which men walk over without knowing it.”

Observations

The Pharisee noticed right away that Jesus did not wash his hand before meal time. Yes, growing up we all were taught that we should wash our hands. But that is not as important as having a clean heart and mind. And tithing is also important, but not as important as loving God. And the way people see us and respect us is also important, but the way God sees us is most important. And it should be important to us to always be cleansed of sin and to have a right relationship with Him.

Application

Beware of people who are like Pharisees, who always look to impress others, but care not what God thinks. They care about how they look on the outside, but inside they are dead, dead to God.

Jesus and the Pharisees: from Luke 7:28-35

Jesus and the Pharisees: from Luke 7:28-35

This is our twenty-third study. Please click HERE for an intro to this study.

Luke 7:28-35

28 “I say to you, among those born of women, there is no one greater than John; yet he who is least in the kingdom of God is greater than he.”  29 And when all the people and the tax-gatherers heard this, they acknowledged God’s justice, having been baptized with the baptism of John. 30 But the Pharisees and the lawyers rejected God’s purpose for themselves, not having been baptized by John. 31 “To what then shall I compare the men of this generation, and what are they like? 32 “They are like children who sit in the market place and call to one another; and they say, ‘We played the flute for you, and you did not dance; we sang a dirge, and you did not weep.’ 33 “For John the Baptist has come eating no bread and drinking no wine; and you say, ‘He has a demon!’ 34 “The Son of Man has come eating and drinking; and you say, ‘Behold, a gluttonous man, and a drunkard, a friend of tax-gatherers and sinners!’ 35 “Yet wisdom is vindicated by all her children.”

Observations

Jesus here observed the Pharisees’ childish behavior. They rebuked His behavior of eating and drinking with sinners in order to befriend them. But they also rejected John’s more rigid behavior of abstinence, a behavior that they said Jesus should have. This reveals that they were rejecting anyone who was a true believer in God. They were revealing their pagan nature.

Application

We should be able to judge whether a person is a true Christian or not by their attitude toward good Christians. A pagan, like the Pharisees will always have a negative attitude toward any true Christian; they will always find something wrong with them.

Jesus and the Pharisees: from Luke 5:17-26

This is our twenty-second study. Please click HERE for an intro to this study.

Luke 5:17-26

17 One day as he was teaching, Pharisees and teachers of the law, who had come from every village of Galilee and from Judea and Jerusalem, were sitting there. And the power of the Lord was present for him to heal the sick. 18 Some men came carrying a paralytic on a mat and tried to take him into the house to lay him before Jesus. 19 When they could not find a way to do this because of the crowd, they went up on the roof and lowered him on his mat through the tiles into the middle of the crowd, right in front of Jesus.

20 When Jesus saw their faith, he said, “Friend, your sins are forgiven.”

21 The Pharisees and the teachers of the law began thinking to themselves, “Who is this fellow who speaks blasphemy? Who can forgive sins but God alone?”

22 Jesus knew what they were thinking and asked, “Why are you thinking these things in your hearts? 23 Which is easier: to say, ‘Your sins are forgiven,’ or to say, ‘Get up and walk’? 24 But that you may know that the Son of Man has authority on earth to forgive sins. . . .” He said to the paralyzed man, “I tell you, get up, take your mat and go home.”  25 Immediately he stood up in front of them, took what he had been lying on and went home praising God. 26 Everyone was amazed and gave praise to God. They were filled with awe and said, “We have seen remarkable things today.”

Observations

It is very interesting that so many Pharisees came to hear his teaching. Why did they come? Did they really want to hear his teaching, or to catch Him in a sin? When Jesus said to the man, “Your sins are forgiven, they immediately thought that they had caught Him at blasphemy. But Jesus confirmed His qualifications to them by also healing the man.

Application

You should never absolutely trust someone’s loyalty, just because they come to hear you like the Pharisees did to Jesus. Those who are loyal to Jesus and truly believe in Him will humble themselves and be converted. Jesus was always suspicious of the Pharisees, yet He never gave up on them—and a few were saved.

Jesus and the Pharisees: from Matthew 27:62-64

This is our twenty-first study. Please click HERE for an intro to this study.

Matthew 27:62-64

62 The next day, the one after Preparation Day, the chief priests and the Pharisees went to Pilate. 63 “Sir,” they said, “we remember that while he was still alive that deceiver said, ‘After three days I will rise again.’ 64 So give the order for the tomb to be made secure until the third day. Otherwise, his disciples may come and steal the body and tell the people that he has been raised from the dead. This last deception will be worse than the first.”

Observations

The Pharisees called Jesus “that deceiver”.  They regarded Him as an evil deceiver—like the antichrist will be. They had it all backwards. They were calling what is good evil and what is evil good. And they asked Pilot to place guards around the tomb. I wonder if they really thought that He would not be raised and that Jesus’ followers would steal him away. Or if they were trying to prevent Jesus from escaping in case He was resurrected. Either way, they were trying to protect themselves, to keep their right standing intact. They didn’t want to be thought of as liars or false teachers.

Application

Beware of false teachers like the Pharisees. They will be whatever it takes to keep their reputation intact.

Jesus and the Pharisees: from Matthew 23:29-31

This is our twentieth study. Please click HERE for an intro to this study.

Matthew 23:29-31

29 “Woe to you, teachers of the law and Pharisees, you hypocrites! You build tombs for the prophets and decorate the graves of the righteous. 30 And you say, ‘If we had lived in the days of our forefathers, we would not have taken part with them in shedding the blood of the prophets.’ 31 So you testify against yourselves that you are the descendants of those who murdered the prophets.

Observations

By decorating the graves of the prophets, that indicates to me that they were trying to put on a show of self-righteousness, and even trying to cover up their own sins. And when they said, ‘If we had lived in the days of our forefathers, we would not have taken part with them in shedding the blood of the prophets,’ they were not being honest.  John MacArthur has stated, “[This was] a ridiculous claim to self-righteousness when they were already plotting the murder of the Messiah (cf. Jn. 11:47-53).”

Application

It is better to face up to the sins of your descendance and not try to say that you would have lived better. I think we should instead be like Daniel who confessed before God the sins of his people (Dan 9:5-6)—even though he himself was innocent.