How African Americans were Lured into the Democratic Party

After the Civil War almost all blacks became Republicans—the party of Lincoln. So what happened along the way?

Why are they now almost all Democrats? 

And why did Democrats go from demonizing blacks to loving them?

Why did the Democrats go from the party of racism to the party of civil rights?

How can Democrats deny their racism? That they brought in the Ku Klux Klan? That it was the Dems that were the slave owners and the Big Bosses of the slave plantations?

I suppose most Democrats will say that they have changed. Really?

What Happened?

Okay, let’s talk about what really happened. After the Civil War most blacks became Republicans. But they were greatly demonized and abused for it by the Democrat party. And Woodrow Wilson really put a scare into them through the Ku Klux Klan. That scared some of them to vote Democrat.

Then under FDR with his New Deal many more blacks went to the Democrat side. Later, under LBJ many more turned Democratic. Why? What happened?

Many have said that LBJ was suddenly converted; that he was changed from his crude racism to being a nice guy and loving blacks—because of his Civil Rights Act. But that’s not true at all. He was always the same. His Civil Rights Act was all part of a strategy to get the black vote.

Who Was LBJ?

  • He was nasty, a bully, crude, selfish, sexually abusive, a pervert and full of infidelities that he liked to boast about.
  • He liked to lord it over people.
  • He was a typical Democratic “plantation boss.”
  • He commonly used the terms “nigger” and “uppity nigger.”
  • LBJ never changed (got better). He was always the same crude racist.
  • He especially talked crude to the black people that worked for a him as a way of intimidating and lording over them (I could give you some examples, but I won’t).

LBJ’s plan to get blacks into the Democrat party and vote Democrat

During the 50s and 60s, mainly because of the overthrow of Hitler, racism was declining fast all over the country, especially in the south. Many were voting for the first time. These things were a big problem for the Democrats, and LBJ watched in horror. Why? Because white supremacy had been the central political doctrine in the Democratic party for a century.

What would LBJ do to make blacks come into the Democratic party and vote Democratic?

  1. LBJ saw a way to exploit the insecurities and fears of the black man. After the Civil War when the slaves were emancipated, most of them were quite fearful and insecure. Most slaves had been born slaves and that’s all they knew. They were, you might say, institutionalized as slaves. Many of them looked back at slavery, and thought those days were better than being free. Why? Because, even though they were abused, they were always housed and fed and clothed and told what to do. And so, freedom for them was something new and they were afraid of it. So LBJ gave them the Great Society.
  2. What did the Great Society do for them? It made it so that they didn’t have to work. They got a regular welfare check, just enough to survive on. This government money was their new plantation, where the government cared for them. They would look to the government as a new type of plantation Big House. All they had to do was vote Democrat. And if they couldn’t get to the polling place, the democrats would bus them.
  3. LBJ pushed the Civil Rights Act. He did it not because he had changed. It was all to get the black vote. This strategy was revealed one day in what LBJ told two governors in regard to the Civil Rights Act: He said, “I’ll have them niggers voting Democratic for two hundred years.”
  4. He pushed the Voting Rights Act. For the same reason as above.

Conclusion

Blacks didn’t leave the Republican Party because of any ideas of White Supremacy of the Republicans. That wasn’t even true. They left because of the welfare checks they would get. They wanted to be taken care of. In other words, FDR and LBJ exploited their fears and lured them in,.

Donald Trump has made some impact on the blacks, to get them off the Democrat welfare system.

  • To get them working for themselves
  • To encouraged them to get a job
  • To be free of slavery in the Democratic slave plantation

Trump at his rally’s kept saying to the blacks, “What have you got to lose?”

FDR: What you may not know about him

It seems that Franklin Delano Roosevelt was well-liked by most people—even Republicans. He is known for his weekly fireside radio chats, and he made a good show of it. Many I suppose couldn’t wait to hear him. But there were things that he never talked about—that he kept secret. And these secret things I think would qualify him as being one of the worst Presidents.

But why am I telling you this? Why should we dig up negative stuff now? Well because I think history is important for our overall understanding of the world—especially in Presidents. And I think, because he was so well liked, this President had a lot to do with setting the standard for Presidents, especially Presidents of the democratic party.

Overall, the basic criticism of FDR was that he was very controlling; he sought to control the government and the Democratic party; many thought he was headed toward a dictatorship by attempting to pack the Supreme court (And this is what we are doing now); and, he was the only president to run a third term—though the last term was shortened by his death.

Here are five more criticisms of FDR:

1. Many of his allies, after a time, rejected him.

  • His Vice President, John Garner, was not pleased with many of his policies, though we don’t know why.
  • Raymond Moley became a bitter opponent of his New Deal and caused him to turn conservative.
  • Ambassador Joseph Kennedy (John Kennedy’s dad) had an uneasy relationship with him.
  • Journalist Walter Lippmann thought he was unqualified to be President.
  • Publisher William Hearst was highly critical of his New Deal.
  • Al Smith, Gov. of N.Y. also opposed his New Deal.

2. Many were critical of his New Deal.

This New Deal was an extensive government intervention. In this New Deal FDR dramatically expanded the welfare state; he believed in an equal distribution of wealth.

3. Many said FDR was a communist and a fascist.

And many came out and blatantly said that he was anti-God.

4. He was racist for the following reasons:

  • He sent 120,000 Japanese and American citizens of Japanese ancestry to internment camps after WW2.
  • In the 1936 Olympics only white athletes were invited to meet Roosevelt. Even Jesse Owens who won four gold medals was not invited.
  • He did not support making lynching a federal crime.
  • FDR nominated Hugo Black to the Supreme Court, knowing that he had been an active member of the KKK in the 1920’s.

5. He was anti-Jewish.

  • He did not try to prevent the Holocaust.
  • In 1939, 936 Jewish refugees were denied asylum and not allowed into the U.S.
  • FDR knew that Jews were being killed but did nothing!
  • FDR failed to issue any public statements of the killing of Jews in any of his 998 press conferences. No wonder so many people in the U.S. knew nothing about the six million Jews that were killed. Why did FDR keep this a secret? And why did he not at least try to prevent the Holocaust?

When Am I Most Believable?

If you’re like me, you hate it when people don’t believe what you say. There is no worse feeling than when you share an important bit of information with a friend, and he or she immediately turns to someone else to get a different opinion—to check the validity of your statement.

I hate that. Why don’t people just believe me? But then I ask, what makes me unbelievable? Maybe it’s the way I look. Do I look like a dork? A crazy person? An imbecile? Uneducated? Not confident in myself? What is it?

Or maybe it’s more than just the way I look. Maybe it’s the way I come across. The way I act. Maybe I don’t come across to people with confidence. Or maybe they just don’t know me well enough.

Maybe the question I should be asking is, when am I most believable? That’s easy. I am most believable at my job. I’m a house painter; have been for 30 years. Most of the people that call me for work are repeat customers. They know me and know that I do a good job for them. I love it most when they give me a key to get in if they are not going to be home. I love that because that tells me that they trust me.

You know that I’m a blogger; but I’m also a self-published author. It’s important for me to know, or at least to believe, that people believe me, to believe what I say in writing. But it has been especially hurtful when someone I regard as a friend has had no interest in reading one of my books. I don’t mind if they judge me after they have read some of it; but to judge me before they read one word of it is especially hurtful. It is almost like telling me that I have no business writing a book on anything, because I’m just not of that caliber; that I should prove myself first; that I should make a name for myself before I put a book out.

I think it’s most important for people to believe in an authority figure like the President or the governor or a policeman. These days people are really distrusting the police—that’s so sad. But it’s even more devastating to know that they mistrust our President. Many love the President; but sadly, far too many despise him—thanks to the media who constantly spew lies about him.

I think everyone has watched the TV show Bonanza. Out of all the characters in that show, who is the most believable? Well, it has to be Benjamin the father. He is the oldest and has proven to be the wisest. Adam, the oldest son, I think is also quite believable. He just has that look of maturity about him. But little joe and Haus, not so much.

Back to Presidents. Which President do you think has been the most believable—trustable. George Washington is a good choice. But FDR I think is a better choice. He took us through over 3 terms—12 ½ years. Everybody loved him and trusted him (Democrats and Republicans), even though we knew he was less than perfect.

You know, now that I have had a chance to think about it for a while, is it most important that people believe you, believe me? After all, most haven’t and don’t believe in Jesus as they should. I think our greatest effort should be to convince people to believe in Him. But can I convince them if they don’t first believe in me when I try to tell them about Him?

I don’t know. All I can do is try to make myself believable and present the gospel as well as I can—and let the Holy Spirit do the rest. That’s a good thought. I think the Holy Spirit will help to convince a person to believe where I can’t. He will do the work in a person regardless of my inadequacy, my clumsiness, my lack of wisdom and maturity. Thank God that we have such a helper available to us. With His help I indeed am most believable.