5 Ways to Deepen Your Desire in Prayer

Prayer A to Z

Desire is the beginning and the basis of prayer. We cannot pray at all without desire. Now if you want to really deepen your prayer life, you must deepen your desire in prayer. Here are five ways to do it.

1. Pray for desire. Since prayers are somewhat meaningless without desire, if you have just a little desire, I think it would be wise to focus that desire in praying for more desire.  While you are praying you may discover that your lack of desire is even worse than you thought—because you may not feel much like praying at all, for anything!  If that’s the case, it may be that God is already at work in you to answer your prayer. He is creating in you what is necessary to have desire—recognition of your need, which is your first step to achieve it.

Your next step is to focus your…

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How Desire Helps Prayer Gain the Answers

Prayer A to Z

 

M. Bounds has said, “It is the ardor created by desire that burns its way to the throne of mercy and gains its plea.” Again, Bounds said of desire, “This holy and fervid flame in the soul awakens the interests of heaven, attracts the attention of God, and places at the disposal of those who exercise it, the exhaustless riches of Divine grace.” Thus desire not only helps me pray, but it helps my prayers reach God.

But we must not think that what Bounds is suggesting is that we can manipulate God by our desire.  No, God is in no way surprised by our desire or feels manipulated.  In fact, He waits for us to come to Him with desire—that desire that He has already planted within our heart.

Moreover, when we come to Him with holy desire for certain things, we have the promises of God assuring…

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How Desire Helps Us Pray

These few lines were written about twenty years ago in chapter seven of my book, Prayer A to Z and later put in my Studying Prayer blog. Enjoy.

Prayer A to Z

When we desire and seek God, He brings us into a love relationship with Him—a relationship of a son or daughter to a father.  As our Father He desires to give us all the things we need.  As a son or daughter we naturally desire to receive from Him what He desires to give us.  And this is the beginning of what we call prayer.  It is reallythe basis of prayer.

Some Hebrew and Greek words can be translated as either desire,prayer, or request.  For example, I looked up the word desire in my Vine’s Expository Dictionary and found that two Greek words, eratao and aiteo, are sometimes translated as desire, but most often as ask or request.  We could also come from the other end.  That is, if you look up all the Greek words for prayer, there are two words, deomi and deesis

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Desiring God: Following Hard after God

Prayer A to Z

 

Our desire for God is the fruit of a renewed heart; it is a dynamic of the Spirit.  I like what Tozer has said:

You and I are in little (our sins excepted) what God is in large.  Being made in His image we have within us the capacity to know Him.   In our sins we lack only the power.  The moment the Spirit has quickened us to life in regeneration our whole being senses its kinship to God and leaps up in joyous recognition.

Let me bring it to you in this way: we being in Christ, desire of God what Jesus desires of Him—His love, His fellowship, and His righteousness, etc.

Following Hard after God

With this desire, if indeed it is desire from God, we must pursue Him.  That is, we must take our desire and put it into action.  As Tozer has indicated in…

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We Desire God because God Desires Us

Prayer A to Z

According to Tozer, “… Before a man can seek God, God must first have sought the man.”  God’s work of enlightenment within us, therefore, is the secret cause of all our desiring and seeking and praying.  Tozer says, “We pursue God because, and only because, He has first put an urge within us that spurs us to the pursuit.”2

From the beginning of time God has been seeking men and women who have a heart like His so that they would desire Him and do his will (1 Sam. 13:14, Acts 13:22, Isa. 65:2). There is, however, only one way that anyone can truly desire Him with a pure heart: it is by accepting God’s Son and resting in Him, thus by allowing Him to transform them and renew their heart and mind (Romans 12:2).

Now the way it works, the way God makes us desire Him is through…

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The Biblical Meaning of Desire – Six Categories

Prayer A to Z

Here is a biblical study of the term desire. I thought it would be beneficial, in my study of prayer, to get a thorough understanding of this term desire, since prayer has so much to do with it. The biblical meaning of desire is quite broad. In my study I found sixteen Hebrew and Greek words translated as desire, and have put them in the following six categories:

To delight in: Hebrew – chapets, taavah.  This term, as indicated by these two Hebrew words and their verses, convey the idea of delighting in, to be pleased with, satisfied with, and to incline toward.  Thus the meaning here is that when we desire a thing it brings us pleasure and satisfaction, and we are drawn toward it.  The desire could be for good or for evil.  Most of the references I found in conjunction with these words…

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Desire in Prayer–Four Ways Desire Aids Us in Prayer

Prayer A to Z

The following article is an excerpt from Prayer A to Z.

The way I see it, the way God gets a hold of us and brings us to into prayer is by first creating in us a desire for Himself and for what He wants to give us by showing us that we have a need or a lack.  Next, He, in His own way, gets a hold of us and shows us that He can fill that lack; He shows us that He is the great provider and lover.  As He desires us and draws us to Himself He continues to create in us a greater and greater desire for Him.  The more we are united with Him in love the more we desire Him and what He wants to give us; hence, the more we have a desire to pray.

As we go to prayer here are…

Four…

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